Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Mission Ready Services (MRS)’ Category

Week 372: Stealth Correction (also updates on Mission Ready, Blue Ridge and Empire Industries)

Portfolio Performance

Thoughts and Review

First off, the portfolio updates in this post are as of August 24th. I’m a little slow getting this out.  So the numbers don’t include what has happened in this last week.

I really got it handed to me in August.  The portfolio was cruising to new highs in July but those were short lived.  Top to bottom I saw a 6% pullback in a little over a month before finally bouncing a couple weeks ago.  Fortunately that bounce has continued this last week so things aren’t as dire any more.

What was funny about the move is that it didn’t feel like things were going that badly.  Usually when I lose 5-6% in a month (this seems to be an annual occurrence for me) I’m tearing my hair out, contemplating throwing the towel in, and generally in a state of disrepair.

Not so this time.  I have been surprisingly unconcerned by the move.

Why have I taken it in stride this time?  Here are a few reasons I can think of.

1. I lost on stocks that I still have conviction in.  Take for example Gran Colombia Gold (which is one of my larger positions).  I’m just not that worried about the move, as painful as it has been.  I’m still up on my position, and it remains cheap with no operating concerns.  I don’t feel like it warrants my worry.  RumbleOn was another (another large position), touching back into the $5’s at various points over that time.  We know what transpired there this last week.

2. I was getting beat up almost entirely by my Canadian stock positions.  Its probably irrational but I don’t worry as much when its my Canadian stocks that are going down.

3. Earnings for most of my positions were pretty good, even if those results weren’t reflected in the stock price.  Vicor was great.  Gran Colombia was stellar.  RumbleOn was fine.  R1 RCM was another stand-out, as was Air Canada.  No complaints.

Anyways it is what it is.  Things have gone better this week.  In the rest of the post I want to talk about 3 stocks in particular and these have turned into rather long excursions.  So I’ll leave any further portfolio comments for another time.

Mission Ready Solutions

Mission Ready has been halted since July 18th.  Nine times out of ten if a stock is on a 6 week halt it wouldn’t be a good thing.  Yet I’m pretty sanguine about the company’s prospects.  The news so far has been pretty good.

The big news happened on July 31st, when Mission Ready signed an LOI to acquire Unifire Inc.  They followed this up with an update on the foreign military agreement on August 2nd.  Then there was another news release August 7th that gave more detail on the foreign military agreement and more detail about the acquisition.  Finally they followed all of this up with a conference call to investors on August 15th.

Having spent some time reviewing Unifire and the deal, I am of the mind that it is a good one.   I am also cautiously optimistic that it will close.  On the conference call the CEO of Unifire was in attendance and spoke at it.  While that doesn’t mean it’s a done deal, his attendance and all the detail provided by Mission Ready points to it being well along.

Here’s the deal.  Mission Ready acquires Unifire for $9 million USD.  The purchase price is comprised of $4 million in cash and 26 million shares (priced at 25c CAD.  They are also taking on at least $6 million of debt (I say at least because Mission Ready didn’t specifically say what Unifire’s total debt was, only that they would be paying back $6 million USD of debt upon close).  With 129 million shares outstanding at $0.25c, $15 million works out to about 50% of the Mission Ready enterprise value.

Unifire is bringing a lot to the table.

As per the first press release Unifire’s “trailing revenue for the 6-month period ending June 30, 2018 was approximately USD$18.3 million”.  Their net income was $750,000 USD.  That’s a lot more than what Mission Ready has (as per the second quarter financials, Mission Ready is running at about $1 million of revenue a quarter).

More importantly, in the second press release (the one where they expanded on the details) Mission Ready pointed out that Unifire was the following:

  • A Department of Defense Prime Vendor.
  • A contract holder for the Defense Logistics Agency (“DLA”) Special Operational Equipment (“SOE”) Tailored Logistic Support (“TLS”) and Fire & Emergency Services Equipment (“FESE”) programs.
  • held “multiple General Services Administration (“GSA”) schedules, blanket purchase agreements and contracts with organizations such as the Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, West Point United States Military Academy, Idaho National Laboratories, Hanford Nuclear Facilities, United States Air Force, United States Marines, United States National Guard, United States Navy, and many others”

I dug into this a little bit further.  Turns out that Unifire is actually 1 of only 6 participating vendors from the DLA Troop Support program (from this original Customer Guidelines document issued by the TLS).  Here’s a short list of the types of equipment offered by this program:

What does being a vendor of this program mean?  It means that if, as a government organization, you want to order one of the 9,000 items covered by the Troop Support Program, you can (I don’t believe the program has mandatory participation but I’m not sure about that) do it through one of these 6 vendors via this program and get subsidized product.

So who would order through the program?  According to ADS, “authorized Department of Defense, Federal Government and other approved Federally-funded agency customers”.

The overall amounts of product involved are significant.  According to this article:

With both being small-business set-asides, and continuations of prior contracts, the first contract will be used to procure special operations equipment (SOE) worth $1 billion per year, and the second will allow for the purchase of a total $985 million in fire & emergency services equipment (F&ESE).

These are big numbers.  So when Mission Ready stated the following in the August 7th news release with respect to Unifire’s justification for entering into the merger, they weren’t kidding:

Unifire has been limited in its ability to secure the initial capital required to facilitate many of the larger solicitations. Mission Ready has identified sources of capital that will enable Unifire to pursue TLS solicitation opportunities on a much larger scale than they have been able to at any point in their 30-year history, thereby creating immediate and significant growth potential.

Unifire has been getting maybe $30-$40 million a year in total revenue.  But its sitting in the enviable position of being 1 of 6 companies participating in a $2 billion program.  The lost opportunity is significant.

That said, Unifire is a significant vendor for the Department of Defense.  Here is Unifire’s revenue from contracts over the past few years (from Govtribe.com).  It seems to mesh up fairly well with Mission Ready’s stated revenue numbers for Unifire:

In fact Unifire appears to be the 15th biggest Construction and Equipment vendor with the DOD.

What Mission Ready is apparently bringing to the table is availability of capital.  They are going to raise $15 million USD at 25c [note: it was just pointed out to me that the 25c number wasn’t communicated and there was no pricing specified for the PP.  I could swear I read or heard that number somewhere but maybe I’m getting this mixed up with the Unifire shares.  I’ll have to dig into this].  They are also going to enter into a credit facility of a minimum $20 million USD amount.  The idea is that with the capital, Unifire will have a higher “solicitation readiness” and be able to bid on much more than the $2 million per month that they can right now.

Of course the other thing Mission Ready has is a suite of products that will fit nicely with what Unifire offers, and to which Unifire’s manufacturing capacity can be utilized.  And they also have this massive $400 million LOI with a foreign military that we continue to wait on.

On that matter of the foreign military distribution agreement, it appears the wait will continue.  In the August 2nd press release they explained what we already knew.   They had expected to receive orders by now but that this hasn’t happened and while they expect to still receive orders this year, they really don’t know what to expect any more.

They had more comments on the August 7th news release, which was more upbeat, if not cryptic.  With respect to the foreign military purchase order they said the following:

The Company is working diligently to finalize the Licensing Agreement in advance of the initial purchase order(s) (“Purchase Order” or “Purchase Orders”) and expect to complete the agreement for consideration by all parties no later than August 24, 2018.

You could read into it that they expect of some sort of purchase order soon that they need to get this new agreement in place for?  Maybe?  Bueller?  But who really knows.

Here’s what I do know.  I know that if the LOI for Unifire falls through and no PO comes from the foreign military then this thing is going to be a zero (or at least a “5 center, which is effectively the same thing).

But I also know that if the Unifire deal closes, if Mission Ready closes a $15 million financing and a credit facility of $20 million, if Unifire secures the $100 million of business in the next 18 months that is mentioned as a minimum requirement in the terms of the facility, and if the foreign military PO comes through, this stock is going to have a significantly higher capitalization then the current $25 million (CAD).

Honestly, when I review all the details above, I think the odds are on the latter scenario.

Blue Ridge Mountain

Oh Blue Ridge.  This stock has turned out to be a bit of a disaster.  I bought it at $9 and then at $7 thinking that it could be worth maybe $15 in a relatively short time as they sold the company at a premium.  With the news this week that they are merging with Eclipse Resources that value is likely to be realized over a much longer time period.

I still like the stock and plan to hold my new shares of Eclipse.  But I also recognize that this is a broken thesis.

I think what happened here is two-fold.  First, part of the value in Blue Ridge was in their stake in Eureka midstream, which seemed like it could be valued at $200 million or more itself.  In fact when the company announced the deal to divest their stake in Eureka (back last August), they said that the transaction was valued at between $238 million and $308 million (I’m not going to post the slide that breaks down that value because it has confidential written all over it for some reason).

Well presumably, given that the stock was trading at at $225 million enterprise value before the merger, the market didn’t agree.  The problem was that much of the “value” in the Eureka sale was in the form of fee reductions and the removal of minimum volume commitments (which I don’t believe are going to bring any cash in, though I’m still not sure on this).  So it was different than receiving tangible cash.

The second thing is something I missed originally.  As I wrote about in my original article on Blue Ridge last year, they have a lot of acreage prospective for the Marcellus and Utica.  What I didn’t understand well enough at the time was that much of the acreage in Southern Washington county and northern Pleasant county was outside of what is considered to be the “core” of these plays.  While the step-outs Blue Ridge has had so far have actually been pretty good, there is a lot more work to be done before the acreage gets the sort of value that acres in Monroe, Wetzel or Marshall county get.

I kinda figured this out earlier this year, but by then the stock was in the $6’s, which seemed to more than reflect my new understanding, and honestly even if I wanted to sell it at that level I couldn’t have given the illiquidity.

Well now with the Eclipse merger there is liquidity.  I think what you saw in the subsequent days was a lot of the bond funds that had picked up the stock in bankruptcy and who were now stuck with equity (which could very well be outside of their mandate) selling Eclipse in order to neutralize their Blue Ridge position and effectively get out of the stock.

That this seems to have waned on Friday, in particular given a pretty rough Stifel report on Eclipse, is likely a good sign.

My take is that the combined entity is not expensive.  Here is a little table I put together of what the individual parts and the new Eclipse looks like (my $6.64 for Blue Ridge is based on the conversion of Eclipse at $1.50 per share):

If you look at the comps, the combined Eclipse doesn’t stack up too badly.  5x EBITDA for a company anticipated to grow 20% in 2019 is probably a little cheap compared to peers.

Peer comparisons are hard though because there aren’t a lot of smaller, all natural gas, players in the Marcellus/Utica.  From what I can see its dominated by big companies like Range, Southwestern and EQT.  These companies are 10x the size or more.  They generally trade at higher multiples but that isn’t necessarily instructive.  The smaller “peers” are more oil weighted and in other basins.

So what do I conclude?  I’m going to stick with Blue Ridge/Eclipse because A. it’s not expensive, B. the Blue Ridge management team is leading the combined entity has done a good job operationally with Blue Ridge, C. There is a lot of undeveloped acres between the two companies and if they can prove up even a fraction of them the stock price should reflect that, and D. this is a nice way to play the upside option on natural gas.

But it didn’t turn out the way I expected.

Empire Industries

Empire announced second quarter results on August 27th.  It was another “meh” quarter.  But patiently I wait.

The reality is that Empire has been a perpetual “just wait till next quarter” story since last September when they announced the co-venture partnerships.  They have an incredible backlog of business.  Contract backlog as of June 30, 2018 was $280 million.  The co-ventures have a tonne of promise.  But neither the backlog or the co-ventures have translated into results yet.

They continue to struggle to turn the backlog into profits.  In the second quarter gross margins reversed (again) to 16.7% from 19.6% in the first quarter.  Remember that the magic number the company has said they should be able to achieve is 25%.

The problem has been the continued work through of three first generation rides that are being built at very little margin.  In fact the company said on the conference call that these contracts contributed no margin in the second quarter.  I had hoped that by the second quarter we would see the impact of these essentially unprofitable contracts abate.  But that wasn’t the case.

I talked with investor relations about this and it appears that in the third quarter we should see less of an impact.  But whether this means 22% margins or 18% margins is anyone’s guess.

Management also seem to recognize that their cost structure just isn’t low enough right now.  Part of the problem appears to be that they operate much of their manufacturing out of Vancouver.  They hinted that there are going to be changes in this regard in the next few months.

One of the key opportunities was how rapidly the growth — the market was growing, but with this growth came an increasingly apparent need to improve our cost competitiveness to capitalize on this growth. As a result, Empire has undertaken an aggressive action plan to reduce its cost structure, as described in detail on previous calls by Hao Wang, President and Chief Operating Officer of Dynamic Attractions, a wholly owned subsidiary and the primary business unit for Empire…The organization-wide cost-reduction initiative is well underway, reducing our headcount and fixed costs. Furthermore, we’ve identified and implemented design, procurement and production efficiencies that can improve our execution capabilities and our financial results.

They went on to say that “margin expansion is a top priority”.  This is a good thing because it’s crazy to be letting this backlog pass without making any money from it.

The other piece is expansion.  Again they touched on this (“we’re actively looking at innovative ways to increase our production capacity”) in the second quarter call.  It’s clear that right now they are capacity constrained. For instance, the backlog has essentially doubled over the last year and a half and yet the quarterly revenue is pretty much the same.  Its nice to have a backlog that extends out 3 years but it would be nicer if they could grow revenue a bit.

And then there is the co-ventures.  Nothing to announce but still on-track to be announced this year.

Just to recap the co-ventures, last August Empire announced the creation of two co-venture attractions companies.  The intent of these companies were to partner with “tourist-based locations” to co-own and operate Flying Theatre rides.  One of the companies, called Dynamic Entertainment Group (DEGL), would partner with US locations, while the other, called Dynamic Technology Shanghai (DTHK), would partner in Asia (China most likely).

It was a complicated structure with a rights offering (at 50c) and a private placement to their Shanghai partner Excellence Raise Overseas (EROL) also at 50c.

In total Empire invested $12 million in the ventures.  They own 62.5% of DEGL and (I think) 22% of DTHK.  The ownership in DTHK is via DEGL, which is makes things complicated.  The other 28% of DEGL and 78% of DTHK is owned by their partner EROL.  EROL and Empire invested at the same valuation.  Got that?

This somewhat ridiculously complicated ownership structure can be summed up with the following graphic (from the September 2017 presentation):

At the end of the day Empire gets to own 63% of a venture that will build and operate attractions in the United States and about 20% of a venture that will do the same in China.  Empire also gets to build the attractions that these ventures market.  Originally this was going to be at a low margin of 15% but given the recent results that margin is looking to be pretty much right in line <rolls eyes>.

Way back when the venture opportunity was finalized I was able to dig up more information on the economics of the attractions business.  First, I found information on the economics of what appears to be a fairly similar existing ride called FlyOver Canada.  The attraction is part of Canada place in Vancouver.  Flyover Canada is a virtual flight ride experience.  Its also owned by a public company named Viad, so unlike every other attraction I read about, there is actually publicly available information about its performance. Here is a quick summary from the 2016 Viad 10-K:

Flyover Canada showcases some of Canada’s most awe-inspiring scenery from coast to coast. The state-of-the-art, multi-sensory experience combines motion seating, spectacular media, and special effects including wind, scents, and mist, to provide a true flying experience for guests. FlyOver Canada is ideally located in downtown Vancouver, Canada. FlyOver Canada is rated by Trip Advisor as the #1 “Fun & Games in Vancouver” and has been awarded with the Trip Advisor Certificate of Excellence.

Flyover Canada is essentially a flying theater, which is the exact same attraction that Empire is looking to co-venture.  Empire has built numerous flying theaters in the past and references a number of them on their website’s Flying Theatre description.  It doesn’t appear that Empire built Flyover Canada (it was a competitor Brogent) but they did build Flyover Italy, Soaring over California, and Soaring, a Florida attraction.

Viad purchased Flyover Canada from Fort Capital at the end of 2016.   According to the Fort Capital press release at the time of the sale, the purchase prices was $69 million Canadian (remember if all goes well Empire and its ~$50 million market capitalization is going to own 63% of one of these in the US and 20% of another in China).  Flyover Canada had 600,000 guests and generated $11 million in 2016, so it’s a $20 a pop ride.  In their 2016 10-K Viad gave the following 2017 forecast for FlyOver Canada:

FlyOver Canada is expected to contribute incremental revenue of $9 million to $10 million with Adjusted Segment EBITDA of $5 million to $5.5 million.

The numbers are in US dollars.  Flyover Canada ended up doing $10 million of revenue in 2017, and though there was no EBITDA breakdown I have to assume it was close to expectations.  So it’s margins of 50%+

At the time I talked to IR about the opportunity.  The information I got was that depending on the size of the ride, revenue would be around $8-$14 million USD per year depending on the size.  Margins on the ride would be around 50%. A smaller ride would cost $10 million to $12 million to build, while a larger attraction would cost $18 million.  So these numbers are all pretty much inline with Flyover Canada.

The idea was (and is) that net to Empire’s 60% ownership, and assuming a split with a landowner, they should get somewhere between $3 million to $4 million of recurring EBITDA (CAD) out of the US deal.  I didn’t get any information on the Chinese opportunity.

Empire (via Dynamic Entertainment Group) would partner on the attraction with a landowner in a tourist destination.  The deal would be structured so that Empire got a preferential return until the cost of the ride is paid off.  Empire would make 10-15% margins on the design and construction of the attraction as per their contract with DEGL.  There is also a $3 million subsidy for developing creative content in Canada which would reduce the overall manufacturing cost to $7-$9 million.

The expectation was that the EBITDA should get a multiple of 10x.  Viad bought FlyOver Canada for about that multiple.  Again, if Empire got a 10x multiple on $3 million of EBITDA, that would eat up much of the current capitalization right there.

Overall, it’s always seemed like a decent venture for Empire once it gets off the ground.  The company invested $12.1 million via $8 million in equity and $4 million in debt.  In return they would eventually get the $2-$4 million of recurring EBITDA from the US venture, add two near-term attractions to their construction backlog (one for the US and one for China), and get some additional EBITDA (I don’t know how much) from the Chinese venture.

Of course like everything else with Empire this is a waiting game.  On the call they said “Before the end of the year, we expect to announce our first co-venture location. We expect to have an opening sometime in 2019”.  Hopefully we get an announcement soon.

Portfolio Composition

Click here for the last six weeks of trades.  Note that this is August 24th, so I’m a week behind here.

Advertisements

Week 366: The Wishy Washy Portfolio

Portfolio Performance

Thoughts and Review

I’ve done a lot of flip-flopping over the last 6 weeks.  I couldn’t get comfortable with certain oil producers, I couldn’t get comfortable with oil servicers and I couldn’t get comfortable with the copper stocks.  I also owned and then sold Cameco and Energy Fuels before settling on buying the debentures for Energy Fuels.

These transactions weren’t trades.  I don’t really trade in my portfolio.  But I often buy into ideas that I am not completely committed to.  Having a position clarifies my conviction.  If I don’t have it, I’ll sell a few days later.

As it turns out it probably wasn’t a bad idea to step away from these ideas.  The oil servicers, which I will talk about below, have done little.  Copper stocks, which I talked about here, have done even worse.    Cameco has floundered.

What I have added and stuck with over the last 6 weeks is RumbleOn and Smith Micro, both of which I have already talked about, GeoPark, which I’ll talk about another time, and Overstock, which I’ll talk about right now.

Overstock

When I first wrote about blockchain I said I found it interesting because: “it’s a way of dis-embodying trust into technology. The middle man disappears. The skim shrinks. Everyone (other then the middle man) benefits.”

Since that time crypto has gone to the moon and crashed again.  While its easiest to base an opinion on the latest bitcoin price, I don’t think that is necessarily correct.  I still think the premise of what blockchain promises has value.  It just has to find ways of being integrated into applications that have broad usage. If I were to bet, I would say that the current lull in sentiment will pass and that blockchain will come back into vogue in some new form relatively soon.

So let’s talk about Overstock.

I bought the stock two weeks ago after tZero announced that they had received a $100 million letter of intent (LOI) from GSR Capital.

Like most things with Overstock, its a fuzzy data point.  First, its an LOI, which doesn’t really mean anything is certain.  Juniors on the Canadian venture exchange love to use LOI’s to put out big numbers and generate big hype (coincidentally I will talk about a situation like that shortly!).  The deals often don’t amount to anything.

Second, GSR Capital looks a bit sketchy.  This post from CoBH kind of makes that point.  Of course you can dig in the other direction and find less bearish takes on what GSR is doing.

I’ve always thought of Overstock as a stock that has an asset value with a huge standard deviation.   You can create a legitimate case that the stock is worth $30 or $80. There is that much uncertainty about outcomes.

It’s all about buying it at the right place within that band.

Being able to buy the stock in the low $30’s (I got a little at $31, more at $32 and the rest at $33), especially after there was incrementally positive news, seemed like a reasonable proposition to me.

The GSR investment, if it is followed through, represents the first time in a while that something Byrnes has hinted at actually happened.  So I’m getting it at the bottom of the band and with a positive data point to boot.

When I sold Overstock in January and February it was because the projections Byrne had made a quarter before were not coming to fruition.

  • He had said the stock lending platform had billions of inventory and would start making money shortly.   But in the tZero disclosures in December there was no mention of the stock platform at all!
  • He had talked about partners knocking at the door.  But all that materialized was Siebert and a couple of other tiny acquisitions.
  • He talked about the mysterious man in the room and one other big opportunity he had.  This turned out to be De Soto, a very interesting idea but something that he himself has said that he only “thinks” can make money.

Byrne also talked at length about the Asian money that was interested in tZero.  That was another strike out.  Until the GSR investment.  Now its not. So something actually panned out.

Its clear that the advanced state of tZero that was described at the end of last year was exaggerated.  It also seems likely to me that Byrne was not entirely aware of the state of the software.  Witness that the CEO of tZERO was replaced by Saum Noursalehi, who was moved over there to add a “Silicon Valley” mindset to tZero:

But I think this is going to become an innovation game. I think that by putting Saum there, I mean he’s extraordinarily able as an executive anyway, but in terms of managing innovation, Saum and I have a decade’s history of working together on [O lab] And other things that have changed our company and I don’t think anyone I’ve met in New York was going to be able to compete with what I know Saum has in mind.

tZero was supposed to offer a stock lending platform and would be on-loading inventory they had accumulated. That didn’t happen and they are now in the business of licensing it out.  The software also probably wasn’t all that functional; on the first quarter call Noursalehi said they were (only now) building out the functionality to allow you to carry the digital locate receipts for intra-day periods.  That this wasn’t available in the original software is odd.

They are also only in the process of building out the token lending platform, which is to say there is nothing operational yet (one of the first major red flag I mentioned from the tZERO memorandum last December was that the security token trading system was described as something that still needed to be built!).

Of course the sale of the e-commerce platform, which was supposed to be done by February-March, is ongoing and now more of a “souffle”.

So there are lots of negative spins you can make here.  On the other hand they are forging ahead with the tZero platforms, they have over $250 million of cash on the balance sheet and another $320 million from the tZero token offering (if you count GSR and all the executed SAFEs), and the sale of e-comm is still ongoing, so there is the potential for a positive resolution there.

There is also the initiatives to transform e-comm into something that is growing.  While these are still in the early stages it seems to be working.  So that’s just another probability to add to the list.

Most importantly, at a little over $30 buck a lot less of the positive potential is priced into the stock then at $80.

Look, Overstock is what it is: a stock with a lot of optionality, a lot of uncertainty, operating in an brand new industry that I don’t think any of us know how it will play out in the next 5 years.

So speculators pretend that the price of bitcoin is somehow a proxy for the state of blockchain. It’s probably not.  I didn’t buy Overstock as a quick trade to capture a short pop on speculation of GSR.  I actually think at $33 it represented a fair value for all the risks and rewards.  So I’ll see wait for the next data point how and evaluate from there.

Wanting to Buy Oil Services but can’t

I’m not a trader.   When I get into a stock its with the intent of sticking with it for 6, 12 or 18 months or however long I need to in order for the idea to play out.

So when you see me in and out of a stock in a short time frame it usually has nothing to do with trading.  Its just indecision.

Such has been the case with the oil services stocks where I’ve been in, out, back in and back out again.

What’s going on?  I’m being torn between two sides.

The bull side is simply this: oil is up, growth in production needs to come from the US, and oil servicers should benefit.  The stocks are extremely cheap if their businesses are on a growth path.

The bear side is that all of the on-shore servicers are exposed to the Permian, Permian capacity constraints are going to kick in this summer, and volume and pricing of drilling and completion services are going to get squeezed.

I should probably just walk away from the idea.  The stocks don’t act well.  Considering that this should be a bull market, the action is even worse.

What keeps me interested is just the absolute valuations.  Below are 5 companies with average EBITDA multiples for 2018 and 2019 (these prices are from a week or so ago but I don’t think anything has moved much since then so I haven’t updated them).

Seems cheap?  That’s what I thought.

But when I buy any of these stocks, all I do is fret about them.

The problem is the Permian.  RBN put out a really good piece describing how the infrastructure bottleneck in the Permian is likely to play out, and what the alternatives now.  Unfortunately it’s behind a pay wall.

The issue is that there isn’t enough pipeline capacity to get the oil out and new pipeline capacity won’t be finished until the second half of next year.  So you have about a year of constrained takeaway.

Source: PLG Consulting

As RBN pointed out the alternatives to pipelines have their own constraints.  Rail can only carry as much as the available tankers and loading capacity.  This is less than 100 thousand barrels a day.

Trucking is theoretically unlimited but the logistics of bringing in trucks and truckers caps it in reality.  A single truck can carry about 180 barrels a day.  So for every 10,000 barrels a day of production you need to add 100 to 150 trucks and drivers.

The Permian accounts for about 50% of activity in the United States onshore.  As an oil servicing business its hard to avoid the Permian.  Exposure of the companies I’ve looked at varies from 30-60%.  Solaris has about 60% of their fleet in the Permian.

But just how much of a hit will these companies take?  That is the other big question.

According to the company’s themselves, they are insulated.  They talk up their long-term contracts, how they are dealing with the stronger operators in the region, and how these operators have secured takeaway capacity and hedged their exposure and thus will be able to keep drilling.

But are they really?  I don’t trust them.  We won’t really know until the second quarter calls start hitting and they have to fess up about the state of their operation.

So what do you do?

For now I’m back out.  I think.

The only exceptions are a couple of non-Permian related servicers that I own.  Cathedral Energy, which I don’t believe has as much exposure to the Permian (though they do have some), and Energy Services of America, which is a pipeline builder in the Marcellus/Utica that has a host of their own problems but the Permian is not one of them.

RumbleOn

I was worried that my lead touch was failing me.  I am resigned to the fact that I take positions in stocks where I will have to endure months of it  doing nothing or going down before it actually begins to move as I suspect it should.

RumbleOn moved as soon as I bought it and before I was even able to get a write-up out.

<sarcasm>Fortunately</sarcasm>, that situation was rectified as the company offered a little over 2 million shares at $6.05.

In retrospect, the entire move to the mid-$7’s and back to $6 was probably bogus.  I don’t understand all the in’s and out’s of these share offerings enough to be able to tell you why, but I’ve been held hostage to enough of them to know that this sort of activity seems to be part of the process.

So what do I think of the move to raise cash?  I don’t see it as a big deal either way.  I had thought they might use their recently created credit facility to bridge the gap to profitability.  I figured given the management holdings they’d be reluctant to dilute.  But whatever.  If the business works the 2 million shares is not going to matter much to where the price goes.

I used the opportunity to add more.

Mission Ready

I have been patiently waiting for 9 months for something to happen with Mission Ready. I haven’t said much (anything?) about the company since I wrote about them last September.  That is because essentially nothing has happened.

Nine months with no news (after announcing a massive LOI) is pretty ridiculous.  There is a valid argument that I should have walked away.  But something about the company made me think its more than just a hyped up press release with nothing behind it.  For sure, the stock price has held up incredibly well since September considering that nothing has happened.   So I have stuck it out.

Now maybe we get some news?  The stock is halted.

Is this the big one?  And is the big one a rocket or a bomb?  No idea.  But I am excited to find out.

Gold Stocks

Back in May when I last talked about the gold stocks I own I wrote:

…these stocks are more of a play on sentiment. I think all I really need on the commodity side is for gold not to crash.

I should have knocked on wood.

That said, the gold stocks I own have held up pretty well.  Wesdome is up a lot.  Gran Colombia is up a little (albeit it was up a lot and has given back most of those gains).  Roxgold is roughly flat, as is Golden Star.  Jaguar Mining is down a bit.  Overall I’m up even as the price of gold is down over $100.

I still like all of these names.  But whereas my original thesis on each name was based on the micro – I simply thought each stock was cheap given its cash flow and exploration prospects, I am actually getting more bullish on the macro.  Even as gold has fallen.

This tariff thing is becoming the shit show I thought it would be.  I expect further escalation before any agreement.

There are a lot of US based commentators that think other countries will be rational and give in to their demands.  I really don’t buy that.  I think its got to get worse before that happens.

I’m Canadian.  So I am on the other side of the tariffs being introduced.  My visceral reaction when I hear of a new tariff being introduced against Canada or I hear Trump make some inaccurate or at least unbalanced comment about Canadian subsidies, is “screw them – I would rather go into a recession than give in to that BS”.

Now you might say that is an irrational response, that it is not reasonable, and point out all the reasons it is wrong.  Sure is.  Doesn’t matter.

If that’s my response, I bet that is also the response of a lot of other Canadians, and of a lot of other citizens of other countries.  We would rather see our government’s stand up for us then be pushed around.

You don’t think that all the other foreign leaders don’t realize that?  Look at what Harper just said: that Trudeau is manipulating the NAFTA negotiations because he can gain political points.  Maybe, maybe not.  It wouldn’t be that surprising.  Does Trudeau get more votes next year if he can say he stood up for Canadians or if he says he buckled under because it was the right thing to do?  You think the European leaders look stronger if they give into US demands?  Same thing for China.

My point is we are all going to stand up for ourselves.  It won’t be until we all see (including the US) what it feels like to be sinking in the boat that we reconsider.  Right now this is a matter of principle and what is rational is irrelevant.

I expect the trade war to escalate.  And gold to eventually start going up.

DropCar, Sonoma

I sold out of both DropCar and Sonoma Pharmaceuticals.

DropCar has been a disaster. When I wrote the stock up I said it was highly speculative, even for me.  But I have to admit I didn’t expect it to crash and burn so quickly.

I don’t like selling a stock just because its just dropping.  If there is a negative data point that comes out, then sure I’ll dump it in a heart beat.  But random drops are frustrating and I often will hold through them.

But the DropCar collapse was too much and I reduced my position in April.  That turned out to be a good idea.  I sold the rest of the stock after the first quarter conference call.  It was just such a bad call.

During the Q&A they were asked about gross margins.  They could have provided a long-term speculative answer, talking about how margins are being pressured because of their growth and the drivers they are hiring, and how long term they expect margins to settle in the mid-teens or low twenties.

They didn’t have to be specific, they just had to spin it positively.  Instead they basically deferred the question.  We aren’t going to talk about that.  You can maybe get away with that answer when things are going well, but when you just announced a negative gross margin quarter you just can’t.

Anyways, I sold.

The other stock I sold was Sonoma Pharmaceuticals.  Sonoma had what was just a really bad quarter.   Sonoma had been growing consistently for a number of quarters and much of my thesis here was simply a continuation of that trend.  That didn’t happen.

The problem is if they don’t grow they are going to have to raise cash again.  They have a limited run way.  The company kind of implied on the call that this was a blip, but it wasn’t enough to convince me with certainty.  So I figured I better sell and wait to see what the next quarter brings.  If they are back on track, I will add it back.  There is still a lot I like about the story.

Portfolio Composition

Click here for the last six weeks of trades.  Note that I added Energy Fuel stock to the practice portfolio because I couldn’t add the debentures (a limitation of using the RBC practice portfolio).  Also note that Atlantic Coast Financial was taken over and my shares converted but this didn’t happen in the practice portfolio (they just stay halted in the RBC practice portfolio).  That’s another change I will have to manually make before the next update.

Why I was willing to add to Mission Ready Services

Yesterday and today have been busy.  I got smacked on Empire Industries and on Blue Ridge Mountain, but also piled into a number of lithium, vanadium and graphite names that has helped claw some of those dollars back.  I will write about those names another time.  Today I was also working on a second post on Mission Ready Services and I wanted to get that out before anything else.

I wrote about Mission Ready Services on Friday.  Over the weekend and yesterday I spent a lot of time researching the company.  The basic question I wanted to answer was whether the company, and its recent news release, are legitimate?

I may yet be proven wrong about this, but so far I do not see anything to make me think it isn’t.

To recap, the news released last week had the following points:

  • Agreement is with a US based contracting party
  • Agreement is for purchases to a large foreign military.
  • Minimum Purchases as per agreement are (USD): Year 1 (2018), $50MM; Year 2 (2019), $50MM; Year 3 (2020), $100MM; Year 4 (2021), $100MM; Year 5 (2022), $100MM.
  • Advance Payments: Distributor agrees to pay Mission Ready (the “Manufacturer”) a down payment equal to forty percent (40%) of the purchase order amount within 10-days of submitting the purchase order.
  • Exclusivity: Manufacturer appoints Distributor, on an exclusive basis, as its sole distributor for the defined territory.

So its huge if it’s the real deal.

As I have dug into Mission Ready, I have actually been quite surprised with the strength of the company’s product.  Here is what I found.

In 2011 a company called Protect the Force (PTF) partnered with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) in an attempt to develop a better body armor.  This was in response to soldiers complaining about the bulk and discomfort of existing body armor options.

Together PTF and NSRDEC came up with a new body armor called the Ballistic Combat Shirt.  This article talks is detail about the ballistic combat shirt, describing the creative design that was a departure from existing body armors available, how it benefits soldiers, and some of the awards that it has won.  It references Robert DiLalla, who led the team on the NSRDEC side that partnered with PTF to develop the body armor as well at PTF themselves.

There doesn’t seem to be too much question that the Ballistic Combat Shirt (which Mission Ready has called Flex9Armor for their own product distribution) is better than its predecessors.  DiLalla comments that its “35% lighter, form-fitting and more comfortable”, and reduces the soldier’s thermal burden compared to the Interceptor Body Armor system.  Soldier acceptance has been terrific:

“The Soldiers have spoken loud and clear with more than 90 percent user acceptance in multiple user evaluations,” said DiLalla. “Typically, as we assess new body armor components, we’d consider 60 percent a successful number. So we were quiet surprised…”

There is also a video on Youtube of the armor being tested.

In 2012 Mission Ready merged with PTF, and along with them, acquired their development activities.

In May 2015 the development of the new armor was complete and Mission Ready said the US Army Contracting Command was soliciting bids for the Ballistic combat shirt.  PTF bid on the contract.  The company sounded quite optimistic in the press release.  However it was not to be.   In July 2015 they issued another press release saying that they had not won the contract with the US government.  They met all technical requirements but did not have the lowest price (there is a table below that will show the pricing breakdown).

Being the co-developer of the product, this must have stung.  In response PTF filed a protest.  The outcome of the protest was sustained, as described in a December 2015 news release.

“We recommend that the Army either: (1) reasonably re-evaluate the proposals in accordance with the RFP as written, and make new source selection decisions; or (2) re-examine the RFP’s minimum requirements and evaluation criteria, to determine whether they accurately and unambiguously reflect the agency’s needs, and, if appropriate, amend the RFP, re-open discussions, obtain and evaluate revised proposals, and make new source selection decisions.

The GAO decision on the protest also outlined the original bidders on the BCS.

But nothing much has come of it since.  According to this article, the new armor is being rolled out to the US military in 2019.   PTF isn’t supplying the initial order of the product.  After the December news release articulating that they had won their protest, there was nothing further on the matter.  I think a company called Short Bark Industries (second from the top in the table above) won the bid.  I note this article, which describes the suppliers that Short Bark is using to fulfill its order of BCS, and these government contracts (a government contract for $8.86mm, here for another $15mm, and another for $6mm).  Its worth noting that these contracts are for orders until June 2019 and all orders have been obligated, which means they are filled.  Its also worth noting that, at least from what I can tell, Short Bark is in bankruptcy proceedings right now.

But Mission Ready has kept rights to distribute the armor elsewhere.  The patent on the ballistic combat shirt lists them and the US government as assignees, though I am not sure whether that means Mission Ready actually holds the patent, or whether the patent belongs solely to NSRDEC.  In November 2015 Mission Ready signed an agreement with NSRDEC that gives them exclusive rights to market the Flex9Armor to governments outside of the United States and to other organizations within the United States.

In February of 2016, Mission Ready announced the launch of their version of the Ballistic Combat Shirt, called Flex9Armor.  The armor retails for $500-$600 USD (its worth noting that sometime in the last couple weeks a change was made whereby the retail armor can no longer be ordered on the website).  As described in the news release:

Co-developed with the US Army Natick Soldier Research and Engineering Center and launched by Protect the Force Inc., the Flex9Armor tactical solution is ideal for breaching operations, tight spaces, first-responder protection, and training exercises.  While the Flex9Armor is designed specifically for physically demanding conditions, the low-profile ‘exoskeleton’ design maintains comfort and full functionality for greater articulation in the shoulder and deltoid region.

Since that time not too much has happened in the way of contracts.  Mission Ready has added other products to its portfolio (they acquired a company called ForceOne, announced a small contract for Riot shield covers, and established relationships with the government on a couple of other product developments such as a safety vest for sailors) but revenue from any of the products has been lacking.  Until, of course, the recent news.

The order is so big, it seems most likely that is is from the US government.  The “foreign military” in the news release throws me off that trail, but it is a Canadian listed company, so maybe the US counts as foreign?  Edward Vranic wrote something up last week speculating as much.  As I pointed out, the winner of the previous contract with the US government, Short Bark, appears to be in bankruptcy, which seems coincidental.  But I see nothing about a new tender by the government as of yet, and there is nothing yet in the government contract list.

In some potentially related scuttle that I have to warn you I can’t confirm, there have been some comments on Stockhouse about a 10 year Egyptian contract that they are near finalizing.   Its a bit of hearsay because the presentation that discussed this has been modified.  There was apparently an early version of the August presentation that said they are “finalizing teaming agreement in EagleShield International/Tactical Elite Systems in Egpyt for a 10 year deal that Protect the Force would supply body armor for Egyptian military and later law enforcement”.

In the revised version of the presentation (with the reference to Egypt deleted), on slide 25 it says more generically that “Multiple foreign military and law enforcement opportunities identified since the beginning of 2017– Initial shipments expected to commence in Q4 2017”, which is still a pretty bullish statement.  The same slide also says that Mission Ready is “partnering with ADS Prime Vendor on Air Force Carrier and Armor project” (this one hasn’t been deleted).

The bottom line for me is that if the distribution agreement is legitimate the stock is significantly undervalued.  A contract that delivers $500 million over 5 years is clearly worth more than a $25 million market capitalization.  While I can’t be positive that the distribution agreement will lead to those kind of revenues, there are plenty of signs that it could.  I was however wrong when I implied on Friday that this was binding, it’s not.  It’s a distribution agreement, so what really matters is the first purchase order from that supplier and the subsequent funds from that order (40% of which are required to be delivered 10 days after the PO).

I added some to my position yesterday.   The product is there without a doubt.  The design team they have at Protect the Force is technically sound, has developed other products for the military, and received awards for their work.  The CEO, Jeff Schwartz, has a background in manufacturing and so that gives me some comfort (there is a Youtube video of both Schwartz and CTO Francisco Martinez talking about the company here).  Nevertheless I still have questions about manufacturing in those quantities (the distribution agreement implies quantities exceeding 100,000 per year), but they were in the running when bidding on the vest manufacturng a few years ago, and their bid was described as technically acceptable, so I would expect there is a plan for manufacturing.  Most important, I still want to see a PO.

I can’t say with 100% certainty that things will go forward as hoped, but there are enough signs that I’m willing to scale up my bet a bit.

Taking a Moonshot on Mission Ready Services

This is a tiny micro-cap on the TSX Ventures.  I just came across the stock this morning.  They have a $35 million market capitalization at current levels.  Just yesterday they announced a huge contract with a foreign military for their Flex9Armor and No-Contact Tactical Shield Covers.  The contract is for $50 million USD in the first two years, followed by $100 million USD for subsequent years.

I might be wrong, but the agreement looks more legitimate than some you see announced from small venture plays.  This isn’t an memorandum of understanding (MOU) or letter of intent (LOI) from what I can tell.  I have found those sort of agreements are often not carried out in the end.

Nevertheless, I can’t be positive if the contract is legitimate.  But it appears to be.  What due diligence I have been able to do in the last few hours suggests the company has legitimate products.  Earlier this year they announced a contract with the US Navy to develop Electrician’s Impact Safety vests.  That the company has had successful bids with the US defense industry gives me at least some comfort in the current contracts legitimacy.

Buying the stock here means I am adding after what has already been a large run.  It may be exhausting itself and I may have caught a short-term top, hard to say.  My thought adding here is that A. you never know where these things exhaust themselves and B. if the contract gets executed then I am still getting shares for well under the $50 million to $100 million revenue run rate of the deal.

As always, I am taking a small position only, as this quite obviously might not pan out.